Trip to Gulzar Homestay

 

For part of SqW:Lab 2020 the fellows travelled to the main island by boat to Raigad for a nights stay and realistion of Play Project: Curate the Home at the Gulzar Homestay.

As guests of artist Nibha Sikander, the fellows broke up into pair to respond to the play project brief, to find a space in / around the house and create a piece of work / exhibition inspired by an image in a ‘pack’. Each pack contained crayons, paper, tape, felt tips (all from a UK pound shop) and an image Charlie had selected from exhibitions realised in domestic spaces, including Iain Baxter& ‘Bagged Place’ , Paul Newman’s wall drawing detail from ’18th Storey: the Haddon Tower Project’, Hans Ulrich Obrist’s ‘The Kitchen Show’, and Louise Lawler’s image ‘Foreground.’

All works were installed and exhibited for a pne night only exhibition for the fellows and Nibha only. Each duo (or trio in the case of Adam Nathaniel Furman, Charlie Levine and Nibha Sikander) then did a guided tour of their works. This was after the fellows walked to the beach to catch the sunset.

IMG_4098IMG_4105

Open Studio February 2020

For the first open studio SqW:Lab 2020 fellows exhibited works made in the fortnight they were together in Mumbai. The works were the result of the four Play Projects as well as a self directed practice.

Works above created by invited fellows: Ana Cavic, Kyoko Ebata, Adam Nathaniel Furman, Veeranganakumari Solanki and guest Nibha Sikander. Also by Directors, Katsushi Goto, Charlie Levine, Rose van Mierlo and Vishwa Shroff.

“There / Their” a film by Ana Čavić , Katsushi Goto and Charlie Levine

Ana Čavić , Katsushi Goto and Charlie Levine’s response to Rose van Mierlo’s Tender Buttons: Room Play Project was this short performance film. Moving round the Squareworks balconies, that link room to room in the property, we are taken on a shadowy tour of memory, encounter, time and the moon through a series of gazes, objects and shared private moments.

 

HOME photo stories

SqW:Lab explores the domestic, usually through drawing and process. During the lock down in Mumbai, SqW:Lab fellows are responding to The Confluence Collective’s call out for photos of our homes. Here are some of the SqW:Lab fellows responses:

Below is a photo by Ana Čavić of her favourite corner in her home in Ljubljana, Slovenia, and below is a note from Ana about how she is feeling right now and responding with a quote from a poem:

In isolation, I am thinking about the importance of our personal libraries, the books that nourish and sustain us throughout our lives. Alberto Manguel, the most beautiful of writers and a one time state librarian, is almost a fetishist when it comes to books. He once wrote that he considers every book in his personal library irreplaceable, since each is personal to him and bears the traces of his having turned their pages and spent time with them. For him, books are more than mere objects, they are charged with memories poured into them so that each re-reading of a book is a re-visiting of your past self.  This corner is the place I go to for solace. I select a favourite volume of poetry: Michael Dransfield, an Australian poet from the 1970s who died too soon. As I re-read a poem that has become a part of me–‘King Ludwig’s Swans’–I am astonished to find new meanings in it I hadn’t seen before. I reflect on the world as it is today and I recall how it was when I read it for the first time, the time after that and so on. Finally, I set it down and I imagine how it might be when I read these lines again in the future:

their armies do not come
they fear the flowers

image2

 

IMG_5256

Above is a photo by Charlie Levine of a series of corners, lines, shapes, light and shadows in her bedroom in Forest Hill, SE London, with a snippet from Stuart Morgan’s ’Vice-Versa’, 1992, article. 

“We will not understand black holes until we encounter one. And since their eccentricities come into play so gradually, we may not realise what is happening when we do. Entering the penetralia of the universe, where, in the guise of an insane housemaid, God turns reality outside in, inside out, time and again, as if folding a sock, we are held in some steady stay, in which secrecy and openness are neither identical nor opposite but components of a single, complex movement. 

Will this be visible? Or will everything seem the way it was before? Perhaps looking will no longer qualify as a instrument of knowledge l. In a black hole, visible and invisible will meet, the moment of meeting will be prolonged and in one simultaneous expansion and contraction will translate into a new mode of visibility, present though perceptible only as absence. “

 

834fa13a-81b6-4747-8b69-c000eea9eb23

Above is a photo of Vishwa Shroff & Katsushi Goto‘s home in Colaba, Mumbai, and quote from ‘A Journey Around my Room’ by Xavier de Maistre selected to represent thoughts of this space at this time: “My Room is situated in latitude 48 degree east, according to the measurements of Father Beccaria. It lies east and west, and, if you keep close to the walls, forms a parallelogram of thirty-six steps around”

Below is a photo by Veerangana Solanki and a reflection on the lock down in India & her favourite corner in her home: “The human imagination which grasps and unifies time has always had the capacity of undoing time. This capacity is closely connected with the faculty of memory. Yet time is undone not only by being remembered but also by the living of certain moments which defy the passing of time, not so much by becoming unforgettable but because, within the experience of such moments there is an imperviousness of time…All photographs are possible contributors to history, and any photograph, under certain circumstances, can be used in order to break the monopoly which history today has over time” John Berger, ‘Appearances’ in ‘Ways of Telling’

During this time for isolation, I’ve been in the countryside (fortunately) with the option of having nature and the garden as a corner for home – while reading Berger under a tree, these flowers took me back to my childhood when we made floral jewellery, and collected bees and nature tales.

WhatsApp Image 2020-03-26 at 12.47.08

See more on SqW:Lab’s instagram account

SqW:Lab Reading Lists

Histories of Bombay, by Alisha Sadikot from the InHeritage Project

Mumbai Fables – Gyan Prakash
City Adrift – Naresh Fernandes
Maximum City – Suketu Mehta
Midnight’s Children – Salman Rushdie
Memsahibs Abroad – Indira Ghose
Necklace of Skulls – Eunice Dsouza
Kala Ghoda Poems – Arun Kolatkar
Following the Equator – Mark Twain
To the City of Bombay – Rudyard Kipling
Mumbai – poem by Narayan Surve
Ministry of Hurt Sentiments – Altaf Tyrewala

SqW:Lab 2020 Open Studio event

Squareworks Laboratory (SqW:Lab) in Mumbai invites you to join it’s eight creative fellows from Ljubljana, London, Tokyo, Mumbai and Denver to experience the works made during a two week fellowship in Mumbai. 

Inspired by a series of ‘Play Projects’, the SqW:Lab studio space and the city around them, the works made are a mix of video, painting, drawing and installation. The ‘Play Projects’ are central to SqW:Lab’s process of exploring the themes of drawing, the domestic and process. The Projects are designed by the four founding fellows (Goto, Shroff, Levine and van Mierlo) and offer the group a series of instructions to use to produce the works. For example, Vishwa Shroff shared a memory of her childhood home and the fellows responded visually in pairs to this story.

This year’s participants are Veeranganakumari Solanki (curator, IN), Kyoko Ebata (artist, JP), Adam Nathaniel Furman (artist, UK), Ana Čavić (artist, SI) alongside founding fellows Katsushi Goto (architect, JPN, IN), Charlie Levine (curator, UK), Vishwa Shroff (artist, IN), and Rose Van Mierlo (critic, US).

IMG_4098

SqW:Lab 2020 Fellows with Nibha Sikander, Murud Janjira, Kashid beach.

The open studio exhibition will open on:

Friday 14 February at 5pm – 8pm | Saturday 15 February 4pm – 8pm

7 Southlands, Colaba, Mumbai |  twitter/instagram #sqwlab